Listen as Grimes streams brand new song, “Go”

Grimes 2014 - Mac Boucher
Photo: Mac Boucher

Grimes has unveiled a brand new song, “Go”. You can listen to it via the stream below.

It is rumoured that the Canadian artist originally penned the song for Rihanna, but it was turned down by the Barbadian pop star. Featuring producer Blood Diamonds, Grimes premiered the track live at the Governers Ball festival in New York earlier this month.


“It’s our summer jam so we figured we should put it out cuz I am very bored of waiting to finish my album b4 releasing new music haha,” said Grimes, real name Claire Boucher.

You can download “Go” for free from Grimes’ official website. Her fourth album is expected to be released later this year.

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Who the hell are Iceman Thesis?! Video Update!

DOWNLOAD Festival 2014 - Day 2
Photo: Getty Images

Are you one of the many metalheads who has been wondering who the hell anonymous metal band Iceman Thesis are?

Well, Metal Hammer is reporting an answer for you, sort of…

Following their dual appearance at Download festival, on different stages AT THE SAME TIME, a parcel was received from the band themselves containing a memory stick. Here are the video contents:

So Iceman Thesis are actually various members of Five Finger Death Punch, Trivium, Killswitch Engage, Skindred, The Defiled, Behemoth, Chris Jericho, Upon A Burning Body, Krokodil, While She Sleeps and more? Really?!

During their dual sets at Download, the band also threw VHS tapes in to the crowd, the footage from which has made it’s way on to the web:

So will we ever find out who Iceman Thesis really are? Do you believe the information in the videos?

Who do you think they are?!

Watch the videos and let us know your thoughts!

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Tesla release video for new track “So Divine”

Tesla So Divine Screen Cap 640x360

Tesla have released an official video for new song “So Divine”, taken from their seventh studio album, Simplicity, which was released earlier this month.

The band were back in the UK last week to play a set at the 2014 Download festival, as well as a headline show in London at Islington Academy.

Speaking to Team Rock Radio recently, guitarist Dave Rude discussed his fear of being bottled off-stage when the band find themselves sandwiched between more extreme acts on festival billings:

“We did a show in Germany last week with Testament and fucking Annihilator and all these hardcore bands. Every time we’re about to get onstage at those festivals I think, ‘Man, we’re gonna get bottled – it’s gonna be nuts,” he said.

“But no: there’s dudes with leather jackets and upside-down crosses tattooed on their faces, going ‘Love will find a way!’ All the Slayer fans fucking love Tesla.”

You can watch the video for “So Divine” below. Simplicity is out now on Frontiers Records.

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Ginger Wildheart: “I’m surprised anyone gives a f**k who I am!”

Ginger Wildheart
Photo: Getty Images

The Wildhearts mainman Ginger has been speaking to Team Rock Radio at this weekend’s Download festival.

Ahead of two appearances at the Castle Donnington metal fest, Ginger declared that Motorhead’s Lemmy was his icon, and that he’s only still alive because Lemmy is too.

“I’ll never get used to Lemmy saying hello before I do. That’s the best thing of being the part of this little fraternity of ours,” he said. “And the fact that I’m still alive – that was never part of the deal. I was going to go around 25 or 30; I’m 49 fucking years old.”

“How did that happen? Because Lemmy is my icon, and he did it. If my icon was someone like Sid Vicious or Johnny Thunders I’d already be dead. But my icon is better than your icon. Lemmy’s a good icon to have – he’s indestructible.”

Something of a rock n’ roll icon himself these days, Ginger also admitted that he’s still surprised when he meets his music heroes and they know who he is: “I had a tweet from Dee Snider mentioning me. He said, ‘I’m going to be backstage getting ready to go on, but I’ll be singing every word of My Baby Is A Headfuck.’ I was thinking, ‘Wow, that’s another part of my bedroom wall come to life – referencing a song I’ve written.”

“I walked by the guys in Status Quo and they said hello; I didn’t have to introduce myself. I’m still surprised that anyone knows or gives a fuck who I am.”

You can listen to Ginger’s interview with Team Rock Radio below:


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Under The Skin: Is Heavy Metal in rude health, or just rude?

Download Festival 2013
Photo: Download festival

Following this year’s Download festival, Skin Back Alley’s Founding Editor pens some thoughts – and poses some questions – about the heavy metal community, the perception of it within other segments of society, and how it wants to be seen and understood in the future.

I read an article in The Guardian last week about heavy metal that, if you’ll forgive the music related pun, struck a chord with me on many levels.

Timed to coincide with the advent of this past weekend’s Download festival, the thrust of the article was ostensibly that whilst trends in the popularity of certain genres of music may come and go, metal’s popularity has remained remarkably consistent.

The article notes that, according to data from the UK’s Official Charts Company, metal’s share of UK album sales has varied by no more than one percentage point, from a high of 7.3% in 2006 to a low of 6.3% in 2009. So, despite many declaring that rock is dead, one particular strain seems to be doing just fine, thank you very much.

Stuart Galbraith, chief executive of Kilimanjaro Live, organisers of July’s Sonisphere festival at Knebworth, is quoted as putting this down to “…the vast loyalty of the audience, and that’s engendered by the enormous sense of community. It’s much more avid in its love of music, much more likely to spend money to see it live, and music is much more likely to be part of their lives and something they talk about in the pub. If you look at the social media stats on a festival such as Sonisphere, the numbers engaging us are far ahead of any other genre.”

That seemed to chime with my recent thoughts about the maligning of heavy metal as a genre in the wake of the recent furore surrounding Metallica’s headline appearance at this year’s Glastonbury festival. I argued here that at it’s best “…Metal is supportive of – and promotes – education, intelligence and critical thinking, in order that you might make the best of yourself as an individual, and help those in the world around you make the best of themselves, too… For all it is seen as an aggressive form of music, the metal community is actually extremely tolerant and open-minded.”

I would stand by that summary and defend metal as a genre to anyone who chooses to attack it, but a few things have made me sense-check my own thinking in the past few days.

The first was a response to my previous article from a very close friend, suggesting that their experience of metal and it’s fans was very different. Speaking as black, Jewish female living in the Caribbean, she had been subject to something much less than my experience as a white, male fan living in the UK.

Secondly, whether I like it or not, outside of it’s fan base, there is a perceived conservatism within the metal genre; a perception of a resistance to change. But yet again, as the Guardian article notes: “…metal is actually one of the most restless of genres, with a profoundly experimental outer edge.” So why is that perception of metal in the wider community there?

Finally, I’ve been amazed, appalled and pissed off in recent days by the grumpy prejudice I’ve seen amongst the metal community about popular and mainstream events such as football’s World Cup. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, of course they are. You can reject the wider public, sport and football in particular if you so wish. But at the same time, just as I was recently highly critical of ill thought out, over-simplified and clearly prejudiced arguments against heavy metal, football fans are just as likely to be pissed off at the metal community for the comments I’ve seen of late.

So what is my point in all this? Essentially, that as a community of fans we need to practice and promote what we preach. Individual expression, freedom, tolerance, love, acceptance, equality, a progressive attitude: these are all things that, at it’s best, I still believe heavy metal values, supports and encourages. But do we outwardly project that?

Metal has historically actively positioned itself in opposition to the mainstream, providing an alternative experience for those who do not feel they can accept, or are a part of, the dominant hegemonic models. That’s great; amazing. But we also need to be careful that we don’t become over-zealous in criticism of those who do feel a part of that mainstream. Remember, for some, sport and football, pop music, religion, fashion – all the things I've seen metalheads stereotype and be simplistically critical of in recent days – have provided exactly the same solace, comfort, acceptance and purpose for them as metal has for us; for you.

heavy_metal_liveLet's be what we want to be; let's live outside of mainstream culture in the dedicated and loyal community that we've built; but let's do that in a way that is respectful and tolerant of those who don't wish to join us.

Rock on. Horns up. \m/

You can read the entirety of the Guardian article referenced here.

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